Friday, October 19, 2012

Lining a Pringles can for soaping!

I know soapmakers can be pretty creative and thrifty with items to use as soap molds. One that my honey had been wanting to try for a while was a Pringles can. I guess he just liked the idea of it. I had a small long piece of loofah that I wanted to use in a round soap, but thought it would look funny in my larger heavy duty round column mold, so I agreed to try it out in the chip can. We gave his teenage brother some cash to go pick up a tube of Pringles from the store for us, and he got to eat the chips, so it was a win-win for everyone. 

We racked our brains trying to figure out how to line this can. It seemed that most soapers online suggested not lining at all, but there was a very high possibility the soap wouldn't come out cleanly. Some suggested lining with freezer paper, but we are bad at measurements..... So my honey came up with the brilliant idea to use a flexible plastic cutting board sheet. The idea is the same as the liner that comes with Bramble Berry's column mold. We didn't trim it to size, just let it overlap itself. A little soap seeped between in places, but not bad at all, even with a fairly thin trace. It actually worked really great! 

Can you tell a teenage boy picked this flavor of chips?

We cut off the metal bottom, secured the top with plastic wrap and the lid, and wrapped it well for a really good gel. We waited two days to unmold, just in case, and it slid right out without a hitch. These plastic sheets are really cheap too, less than three dollars each, and easy to find at kitchen stores, dollar stores, etc. (Here's an example of what we used, in case you've never seen one or know them by a different name.)

The soap was a little difficult to cut, of course, with all that loofah in it. It was actually more like sawing a log. I left that job to my honey, and he did as good or better than I probably would have. He even beveled the edges with a veggie peeler. Definitely not the prettiest soap I've ever seen, but I think it will be really nice. The loofah was very soft, and we also used a new recipe with palm kernel oil and lots of cocoa butter, plus essential oils of lavender and tea tree. It was hard for me, but I left it uncolored.....


I know it would have been easier to slice the loofah up and use individual cavity molds instead, but I wanted to try this out. Not sure if maybe there is an easier way to slice through the soap and loofah without making such a mess, but I will definitely take any advice on the subject!


12 comments:

  1. Great idea lining the mold! Are you able to reuse the cans if you line it? I usually leave mine unlined and tear the can off, but then I can't reuse it. Your loofah soap turned out great, I love lavender and tea tree combined...smells so fresh and clean!

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    1. Thanks Cee! And yes, the mold is still reuseable.

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  2. It seems that lining the mold really helps! I made similar loofa soaps couple of times before but used PVC tube without any lining. It was very difficult to take out soap from it. My soap stood about 5 days in this tube and I helped myself with beer can (which had the same surface as tube) to push soap out of the tube. Not so elegant method but works. I did not have so many difficulties to cut the soap, maybe because it stood longer in the mold which helped softening the loofa.

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    1. Ah, I never thought of the loofah getting softer the longer it sat in the mold, I will have to try that next time!

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  3. I used cellofane to line up my pvc molds and worked out great. It's cheap,smooth and the soap comes out easily. Also,it doesn't have to be perfectly shaped to fit in.
    Your soaps turned out so nice, I always been wondering if loofa scratches the skin,it's so rough when unwet.
    Your soap's edges are so nicely rounded,how did you do it?

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    1. Some loofah is definitely scratchier than others. I have had some that was really nice and soft and some that wasn't at all. The sponge I used for this soap was locally grown, and it is the softest I have ever felt! The edges on the soaps were shaved with a vegetable peeler, by the way!

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  4. The loofah soaps look great, Laura! And it's so nice that your honey gets involved in soapmaking with you, too. I've never tried to use a Pringles can as a mold, but I have heard about other soapers doing it. Looks like it worked out great, especially with the liner!

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  5. Thanks Jenny, I love that he likes to soap with me too!

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  6. That's a super creative idea! I'm so glad that it worked so well for you!

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  7. Laura, I really like the way those turned out! I have a loofah that I was going to cut and put in my 12 bar mold, but now I'm thinking I might try cutting it in 1 inch slices and putting it in my PVC mold. Maybe then I can cut the log between the slices of loofah. Hmmm... :)

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  8. Yeah, if the slices are big enough to see where to cut, that would work out great! I used the whole long piece, so that made cutting a bit of a mess, but not too bad. We are excited to use them soon!

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  9. I to use Pringle cans and love the size and look. Now I have only used them with melt and pour but I have just poured them in without a liner and they have come out nice and clean. I was actually surprised. Now if you want to use the Pringles can more than once a liner is the way to go. But I have found that you still get a nice clean look either way. I haven't tried cold process yet, but I've heard the same from others that you can go either way.

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